Navajo youth advocate for water, roads, housing in Washington

Students attend the National Congress of American Indian Native Youth Leadership Summit in Washington D. C. Feb. 20-23. (Photo/KUSD)

Students attend the National Congress of American Indian Native Youth Leadership Summit in Washington D. C. Feb. 20-23. (Photo/KUSD)

WASHINGTON D.C. — A group of young Navajo students made a powerful impact on the National Congress of American Indian Native Youth Leadership Summit in Washington D.C. Feb. 20-23.

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Students attend the National Congress of American Indian Native Youth Leadership Summit in Washington D. C. Feb. 20-23. (Photo/KUSD)

The Student Cultural Advisory Committee representing the Navajo Nation and Kayenta Unified School District presented on a topic of critical importance to their community: Changing Native policies.

According to KUSD Cultural Center’s Facebook page, the students’ arguments were based on their personal experiences

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Students attend the National Congress of American Indian Native Youth Leadership Summit in Washington D. C. Feb. 20-23. (Photo/KUSD)

Tricia, 13, spoke about the urgent need to change water rights on the reservation. She revealed that her family is only allowed 500 gallons of water per week for her family and livestock, and she is concerned about the lack of recycling policies. Gabriella, 15, spoke about the poor condition of reservation roads and the need for funding for road infrastructure. Mallorie, 16, focused on the critical issue of housing on the reservation and questioned why new funding allocated to tribal nations from HUD is not being used where it is needed most. Anaya, 13, highlighted the lack of teachers and enthusiasm in teaching Navajo language and culture in schools, which is a major issue for the community.

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Students attend the National Congress of American Indian Native Youth Leadership Summit in Washington D. C. Feb. 20-23. (Photo/KUSD)

Despite their young age, these students made a lasting impression on the summit attendees, who related to their concerns. They are proud representatives of the Navajo Nation, and their efforts to address critical reservation needs are inspiring, the district said.

Visit KUSD Cultural Center on Facebook and here

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