Navajo-Hopi Nations,Flagstaff & Winslow News
Mon, May 17

COVID-19 vaccination quick facts

The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccinations were delivered to states and tribal health centers Dec. 14. (Photo/Office of the Navajo President and Vice President)

The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccinations were delivered to states and tribal health centers Dec. 14. (Photo/Office of the Navajo President and Vice President)

According to the Navajo Nation, the Nation will only use COVID-19 vaccines approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), these COVID-19 vaccines include the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines.

Both COVID-19 vaccines, Pfizer and Moderna, require two doses per person, separated by 21 to 28 days. Both shots must be taken to be effective.

The Navajo Nation said it will vaccinate priority populations before vaccinating the general public as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Receiving the vaccine is voluntary.

COVID-19 vaccine phases

PHASE 1: Limited Doses Available

  • Priority populations
  • Vaccine administered in closed

PHASE 2: Large Number of Doses Available

  • Enough supply of vaccine to meet demand
  • Readily available
  • Available to general population
  • Available through commercial and private organizations
  • Vaccine available through public health sites

PHASE 3: Continued Routine Vaccination

  • Routine access to public
  • Available through commercial and private organizations
  • Vaccine available through public health sites where required

COVID-19 vaccine facts

  • Approved vaccines have been proven to be highly effective and safe.
  • COVID-19 vaccines will not give people COVID-19.
  • It will not cause someone to test positive for COVID-19.
  • People who have had COVID-19 are recommended to receive the vaccine.
  • The vaccine can prevent people from getting sick with COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccine side effects

  • Reported side effects are similar to other vaccines and include temporary arm soreness at the site where the shot was given, fever, tiredness, muscle aches, body aches and headache.
  • A small percentage of people have reported more severe tiredness and headache.
  • Allergic reactions were not observed in the clinical trials but have since been reported in a small number of people who had a history of severe allergic reactions.

More information is available from the Navajo Department of Health website.

Information provided by the Navajo Nation Department of Health

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