Navajo-Hopi Nations,Flagstaff & Winslow News
Fri, March 05

Community approval sought before Crownpoint trails network moves forward

Navajo Technical University is seeking community approval for a new trails network. The identified trails network were named after the four original Diné clans: Kin yaa’áanii Trail, Honághááhnii Trail, Tó dích’íinii Trail, and Hashtl’ishnii Trail. (Photo/Navajo Technical University)

Navajo Technical University is seeking community approval for a new trails network. The identified trails network were named after the four original Diné clans: Kin yaa’áanii Trail, Honághááhnii Trail, Tó dích’íinii Trail, and Hashtl’ishnii Trail. (Photo/Navajo Technical University)

CROWNPOINT, N.M. — Two years of community input crafted the outline for the K’é Community Trails network, a project spearheaded by the Crownpoint Chapter and Navajo Technical University (NTU) in collaboration with the National Park Service.

Organizers are now seeking feedback from trail users to review the plan and provide final recommendation.

The network consists of four pathways in Crownpoint that were formed naturally over time from pedestrians walking to and from various community destinations, such as the chapter house, grocery store, or one of Crownpoint’s five educational institutions.

Each pathway varies in length and difficulty, but each encourages physical activity and highlights Crownpoint’s natural landscapes.

photo

(Photo courtesy of NTU)

K’é Community Trails said its main goal is to improve quality of life through better walking, biking and running pathways and in the process to create a healthier community.

The four identified pathways the project will seek to formalize, include an informal trail south of West Mesa housing by Crownpoint High, the old Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) school’s track and the pathways between NTU and Diné College.

Teepee Trail, the adventure trail heading south of Crownpoint into the mesas, will also be included in the network.

Organizers are planning on rebranding each trail based on the four original Navajo clans: Kin yaa’áanii Trail, Honághááhnii Trail, Tó dích’íinii Trail and Hashtl’ishnii Trail.

Data that helped inform the plan was collected over survey, mapping exercises, and focus groups. Online work sessions were also made available after COVID-19 made contact with the Navajo Nation in March. The information collected helped identify each trail while providing suggestions for amenities and improvements.

A community park, for example, is suggested for the old BIA school’s track while improving the surfacing to function in all weather, perhaps rubberized. Elders within the community identified the track as a safe place to exercise given its flat surface. The idea is to encourage the space to be designed for intergenerational family use.

Technology was encouraged to be incorporated into the trail network to inform trail users about the region’s unique history, which layers Diné livelihood with Chaco culture in present times.

Augmented reality (AR) was planned into each trail to educate the public about the area’s landscapes, flora and fauna, and traditional stories associated with each. Historic structures, such as hogans, appear along the trail network and will be highlighted through AR technology for historic preservation purposes.

Other suggestions for the network include wayfinding and directional signage, benches and shade structures and low impact solar lighting along certain routes.

To request a packet for feedback on the proposed K’é Community Trails network, email Daniel Vandever at dvandever@navajotech.edu. Hard copies are also available at the Crownpoint Chapter or in flyer boxes along each trail.

More information is available on the project’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/KeCommunityTrails.

Information provided by Navajo Technical University

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