Navajo-Hopi Nations,Flagstaff & Winslow News
Tue, Oct. 27

Arizona coronavirus cases near 5,000; 184 known deaths now

Chris Lyndberg gives a free lunch to a truck driver March 31, at a rest area along I-10 in Sacaton, Arizona. The Arizona Trucking Association was giving away 500 lunches from Dilly's Deli to westbound truck drivers in appreciation for delivering medical supplies, food, and other necessities during the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Chris Lyndberg gives a free lunch to a truck driver March 31, at a rest area along I-10 in Sacaton, Arizona. The Arizona Trucking Association was giving away 500 lunches from Dilly's Deli to westbound truck drivers in appreciation for delivering medical supplies, food, and other necessities during the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/Matt York)

PHOENIX (AP) — Positive coronavirus tests in Arizona now have reached nearly 5,000 with 184 known deaths, state health officials said April 19.

The Arizona Department of Health Services said the 4,929 cases around the state were 210 more than the April 18 total with seven additional deaths.

The Mohave County Health Department announced April 19 that a person who was in the age 65-plus range died after being hospitalized in the Lake Havasu City area.

They said the case wasn't epidemiologically-linked to another case and also was not travel-related.

Maricopa County, the state's most populous, has the most coronavirus cases with 2,589 with Pima County second at 913.

All of Arizona's 15 counties have reported at least one COVID-19 case.

The Navajo Nation, which extends into parts of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah, has been hit harder by the coronavirus than any other Native American tribe.

The tribe and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service said the number of positive coronavirus tests reached 1,197 as of April 18 with 44 known deaths.

Officials said the average age of those whose deaths were attributed to COVID-19 was 66.

Most people with the virus experience symptoms such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. Older adults and people with existing health problems can face severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.

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