Navajo-Hopi Nations,Flagstaff & Winslow News
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Three Navajo Nation probationary judges sworn in Dec. 19

Neomi Gilmore, Letitia Stover (above) and Malcolm Laughing each took the oath of office administered by Chief Justice JoAnn Jayne Dec. 19. (Photo/Navajo Nation)

Neomi Gilmore, Letitia Stover (above) and Malcolm Laughing each took the oath of office administered by Chief Justice JoAnn Jayne Dec. 19. (Photo/Navajo Nation)

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — The Navajo Nation Council confirmed three probationary district court judges Dec. 19.

Neomi Gilmore, Letitia Stover and Malcolm Laughing each took the oath of office administered by Chief Justice JoAnn Jayne immediately following the respective votes on the confirmation.

Legislation to confirm Gilmore as a probationary district court judge was approved with a vote of 16 in favor and 2 opposed. Legislation to confirm Stover was approved 17 in favor and 1 opposed. Legislation to confirm Laughing was approved 18 in favor and 1 opposed. Each of the legislation was sponsored by Delegate Otto Tso.

Gilmore is originally from Bahastl’ah (Twin Lakes), New Mexico. She attended University of Idaho Law School where she earned a juris doctor degree. After law school, Ms. Gilmore served as Attorney Candidate of the Navajo Nation Department of Justice Chapters Unit serving 110 Chapters and the Administrative Service Centers.

Stover is originally from Naatsis’áán (Navajo Mountain). She attended University of South Dakota School of Law earning juris doctor and received her Masters of Law (LLM) from the University of Arizona. Before she went back to law school, Stover was a teacher. She was the staff attorney for Kayenta Judicial District Court for the past five years.

Laughing is from Crystal, New Mexico. He has an associate of arts degree in pre-business administration and associate of applied science in tribal court advocate. He has over 17 years tribal advocate legal experience including employment with Navajo Housing Authority, Navajo Nation Credit Services, Navajo Nation Public Defender’s Office and private practice.

The Judicial Branch of the Navajo Nation continues to recruit for applicants for judge as there remains vacancies for district court judges and one associate justice.

Pursuant to Navajo Nation law, the president of the Navajo Nation appoints probationary judges and the Navajo Nation Council confirms the appointments. The probationary judges serve a two-year probationary period and upon completion of the probationary period are evaluated and considered for permanent appointment.

Information provided by the Judicial Branch of the Navajo Nation

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