Navajo Code Talker Edward B. Anderson dies in Phoenix July 20 at age 86

The Navajo Nation Code Talker Memorial in Window Rock. Submitted photo

The Navajo Nation Code Talker Memorial in Window Rock. Submitted photo

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz.-The Navajo Nation mourns the loss of another warrior.

On July 20, former Navajo Nation Code Talker Edward B. Anderson passed at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Phoenix. He was 89 years old.

"The Navajo Nation sends our deepest condolences and prayers to the family during this time of mourning," said Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly. "We lost a true role model to our Navajo people. The Navajo Code Talkers saved our country from war through the use of our language and demonstrated the power of Dine' bizaad in the process. He will truly be missed."

Anderson was born and raised on the Navajo Nation and was a lifelong Arizona

resident.

Born in St. Michaels to Josephine Gatewood and Edward B. Anderson Sr. of Sawmill, he was of the Honaghaahnii (One Who Walks Around) Clan and born to the Todich'ii'nii (Bitter Water) Clan.

Anderson enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at the age of 18 and served from 1942 to 1945, when he was honorably discharged.

A member of the 1st Marine Division, Anderson was stationed in the South Pacific and Australia. He saw combat at Guadalcanal, New Guinea and New Britain.

He was wounded in battle and was a recipient of the Purple Heart, South Pacific Ribbons and the Congressional Silver Medal.

He lived in Cornfields and St. Michaels for most of his life and was married to Ione Hillis Anderson, who preceded him in death. They had five children, six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

The funeral for Anderson took place July 25 at the Ganado Presbyterian Church. He was buried at the Veterans Cemetery in Ft. Defiance, Arizona.

Comments

Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comment submissions may not exceed a 200 word limit, and in order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.