New Miss Navajo Nation crowned

Submitted photo<br>
Miss Jumbo is extremely proud of her accomplishment, and hope to do her people proud

Submitted photo<br> Miss Jumbo is extremely proud of her accomplishment, and hope to do her people proud

Winifred Bessie Jumbo, Miss Navajo Nation 2010-2011 will be giving up her title as the ambassador for the Great Navajo Nation on Saturday - September 10, 2011 at the 65th Annual Navajo Nation Fair at the capital of the Navajo Nation Window Rock, Arizona. Miss Jumbo has been an advocate for Education and Language preservation for her platform. She has visited many schools across the Navajo Nation and presented her Senior Thesis at Harvard University and University of Massachusetts. - Freshman Year Navajo Preparatory School - Class of 2006 Valedictorian Brown University - B.A. in Anthropology, B.A. in Ethnic Studies , Honor Thesis Award, Joslins Award

Yá'át'ééh! Shí éí Winifred Bessie Jumbo yinishyé. Bisdahłitsodéé naashá. Naadiin naaki shinááhai. Naakaii Dine'é nishłi. Ta'neeszahnii báshíshchíín. Hashtł'ishnii da shicheii. Táchii'nii da shinálí. Shimá éí Vida Bessie Frank wolyé. Shizhé'é éí Freddie Jumbo wolyé nít'éé'.

Greetings! I am a young Diné woman from Two Grey Hills, NM. My parents are Ms. Vida Bessie Frank and the late Mr. Freddie Jumbo. I have four wonderful siblings. We are born to the Wondering People Clan and born for the Tangle People Clan. Our maternal grandfather was of the Mud People Clan and our paternal grandfather was of the Red Running into Water People Clan. My maternal grandmother is Ms. Bessie Napoleon originally from Blackhouse Mesa, NM and my paternal grandmother is Mrs. Grace Jumbo from Two Grey Hills, NM. My late maternal grandfather was Mr. Johnson Frank originally from Dził Na'oodiłii, NM and my late paternal grandfather was Mr. Charlie Jumbo from Toadlena, NM.

The Navajo language has always been a very important and vital aspect to the Navajo people. My grandparents and parents always spoke the Navajo language while I was growing up as a child in Two Grey Hills, NM. I was very fortunate enough to grow up in a bilingual household where both of my parents spoke the Navajo and English languages. My paternal grandmother is a monolingual speaker of the Navajo language. My late paternal grandfather and late grandaunt were also monolingual speakers of the Navajo language. My maternal grandmother is a bilingual speaker of the Navajo and English languages as was my late maternal grandfather. I strongly believe that speaking the Navajo language has shaped and influenced my identity as a Navajo person.

Throughout my reign as Miss Navajo Nation I would like to share my educational and personal experiences with the Navajo people to inspire and motivate young individuals to set positive goals and accomplish them. Also, I would like to challenge everyone to learn their Native languages and to make an effort to learn about their Native cultures and philosophies. One day I hope to become a professor of American Indian Studies, which will be my contribution to resolving the limitations and problems in American Indian Studies programs in higher education. I would like to share a unique I would like to see Navajo scholars utilize their unique backgrounds as a foundation for success and motivation to increase the number of Native American students in universities and colleges across the United States of America.

I will not forget the troubled and forgotten youth of the Navajo Nation and I will make it my priority to help these young individuals succeed, so that we can all live by the teachings of Sá'ah Naagháí Bik'eh Hózhóón and T'áá Hó Ajít'éego.

Thank you! 'Ahéhee'!

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