CellularONE expands to Steamboat

STEAMBOAT, Ariz. - CellularONE is pleased to announce the expansion of cellular service in Steamboat, Ariz. Service coverage will reach the entire Steamboat Chapter on the Navajo Nation, as CellularONE has placed a new antenna on top of the water tower in Toyei.

The new antenna in Toyei will be blessed during a ceremony at sunrise on Friday. Following the ceremony, a luncheon will be provided at the Steamboat Chapter House. The chapter house will receive a plaque from CellularONE in honor of its new service and the blessing ceremony.

"With 2,800 people in the Steamboat Chapter, this new site will make such a difference in our everyday lives. We are so happy to receive this gift of better cellular service," said Chapter President Andrew Simpson.

A special one-day phone offer will also be part of the day's events. When Steamboat Chapter residents sign up for VisionOne service, they receive a free phone.

"CellularONE looks forward to the network expansion in the Steamboat Chapter just as much as the residents do. It will give them complete reliability with phone calls, texting and Internet in their homes. It's good to know they can count on us," said Judd Hinkle, CellularONE Chief Operations Officer.

Founded in 1994 in Show Low, Ariz., CellularONE has grown from five employees and 1,200 customers to over 180 employees and 100,000 subscribers. CellularONE has gained market share in the last 15 years, providing millions of dollars in service and equipment upgrades, including expanded coverage throughout northern Arizona, Utah, Colorado and New Mexico. As a premium provider of wireless communications, CellularONE also enjoys a reputation of creating a "best place to work" for its employees, as well as a leading spirit of involvement in every community it serves. CellularONE main headquarters are located at 1500 S. White Mountain Road, Suite 103, Show Low, AZ. 85901.

In 1986, the newest chapter house was constructed. "Steamboat" refers to a rock formation that appears as a steam ship, just north of Arizona State Route 264. The community's Navajo name Ho'yee means "fear" in Navajo. This name was supposedly derived from a "V" shaped canyon, where a natural spring converges with a cliff, a place where the locals feared ambush.

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