Kitchell announces NAU Native American scholarship recipients

PHOENIX, Ariz. - Two students studying construction management at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff are the 2010 recipients of the Kitchell Native American Construction Management Scholarship.

The academic scholarship is awarded to qualifying Native American students who have a grade-point average of 3.0 or above. Noah Sam and Jan Daggett, both juniors, were each awarded $2,000 scholarships in recognition of their academic efforts. Sam's GPA was 3.17, and Daggett's GPA was 3.58.

"We have a responsibility to improve our industry," said Brad Gabel, vice president of Kitchell's Native American Division. "One way to do that is to develop future Native American leaders by recognizing students who are high achievers.

"This year's scholarship provides financial support to two Native American students working to complete degrees in construction management," Gabel said. "It will also benefit Native American communities by ensuring qualified professionals are at the table during the construction process, protecting and respecting their cultural traditions."

Both recipients are active in student and community life. Sam, who comes from the Navajo reservation and is a sophomore in the College of Engineering, Forestry and Natural Science, has been active in the NAU Construction Management Organization (CMO) and the United Way.

Daggett, whose mother is a member of San Carlos Apache Tribe, is in his second year as a construction-management major with a minor in business administration. He is also a member of CMO and president of Sigma Lambda Chi (SLC), the academic honors fraternity for construction-management students.

Established in 2008, the Kitchell Native American Construction Management Scholarship builds on the company's commitment to Native American communities, a partnership that spans almost 30 years. In 1999, Kitchell Contractors established its Native American Division to demonstrate a commitment to the Native American communities it serves and to fully support its Native American clients.

"Our team of Native American specialists have the training and personal commitment to understand each community's priorities, cultural traditions and governmental processes," said Jeff Begay, business development manager for Kitchell Contractors Native American Division and a member of the Navajo Nation. "Kitchell is proud to award this scholarship to two such deserving students. We also look forward to working with them as part of our internship program after graduation when they enter the work force."

An award ceremony will be held later this spring.

Kitchell is a diversified firm focused on general contracting, construction management and real estate development. Kitchell is the first construction company to have a dedicated Native American Division. Kitchell has offices in Phoenix, Arizona, and in Sacramento, Carlsbad, Fresno, Ontario, San Jose and Santa Barbara, California. Kitchell Corporation also owns American Refrigeration Supplies, an air-conditioning and refrigeration parts, supplies and equipment, with 31 branches in six states. Learn more about Kitchell at www.kitchell.com.

Kitchell's Native American Division pioneered the specialty of serving Native American clients on a variety of construction projects. Among projects Kitchell has built in partnership with Native peoples are hotels, casinos, offices, schools, community projects, land development and industrial projects. Employees of Kitchell's Native American division have the personal commitment and training to understand the priorities, cultural traditions and government processes of the Native communities they serve, ensuring each project's success while maximizing employment and training opportunities for local community members.

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