Ft. McDowell hosts annual art show

First year for juried competition

FORT MCDOWELL-The Radisson Fort McDowell Resort is looking a lot more artsy these days with its Native American art marts. The AAA-four diamond luxury resort will host the Fourth Annual Native American Fine Art Show and Farmer's Market on Saturday and Sunday, March 10 and 11. This two-day fest will feature a cornucopia of art, food and entertainment in the relaxed luxury of the Fort McDowell Radisson under the oversight of Hopi artist and art promoter Emerson Horace Quannie, owner of Southwest Native American Promotions.

Saturday's show and market is scheduled to run from 9 a.m to 5 p.m. while Sunday's event is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Quannie, not only a talented art promoter but a jeweler in his own right, got his start in art promotions at the American Indian Heritage Foundation in Falls Church, Virginia in 1984. There he organized the National Indian Powwow and the Miss Indian USA pageant, as well as the first Native American Fine Art Show at the Kennedy Center. He's also helped organize overflow shows during the Heard and Santa Fe Indian markets, and serves on the advisory boards of the Pueblo Grande Museum's and West Valley Arts Council's annual Indian Markets and the Museum of Northern Arizona's Hopi and Navajo shows.

"I look for quality and authenticity in an artist's work," says Quannie. "I know most of them personally."

He envisions the show as growing bigger than many Indian art shows; "We'll have a juried art show in March with cash awards in 33 categories." He anticipates that the shows, which already attract over 200 Native artists will bring in more world-class artists such as Jesse Hummingbird, the renowned Cherokee painter, Laguna silversmith Leonard Paquin, Navajo painter Baje Whitethorne, Lawrence Saufkie, Hopi jeweler, White Swan, Hopi potter, and sculptor Mark Suazo-Hinds, Tesuque Pueblo.

For additional information about the show and market, you may call 480-816-7162 or visit www.ftmcdowell.org/events.

About Fort McDowell: The Fort McDowell Yavapai, the "People of the Four Peaks" are one of three Yavapai tribes in Arizona. The nation, which has lived and prospered in Central Arizona for thousands of years, reside on a 24,000-acre reservation 35 miles northeast of Phoenix. Over the ensuing years, Fort McDowell has opened and/or expanded a number of tribal enterprises, including Fort McDowell Casino, the state's first and best gaming facility. The nation's newest enterprise, the AAA-four diamond rated Radisson Fort McDowell Resort and Convention Center, opened in December 2005.

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