Donation of radio equipment largely enhances learning

POLACCA - The Hopi High Teen Show and KUYI received national attention Sept. 19 as the board of directors and executives from the Corporation of Public Broadcasting (CPB) gave a visit to each.

The CPB entourage were the honored guests at a luncheon at Hopi Health Care Center before they came to Hopi High School to meet and donate equipment to the radio class.

CPB donated two mini disc recorders to the radio class and radio editing equipment to KUYI, which will be used to teach Hopi High radio students editing for radio and will also be used for other work at KUYI.

Lisa Youvella, KUYI manager, was so happy with the radio editing equipment that she shed a few tears.

Youvella said the radio editing equipment is significant because it will allow radio students to learn those editing skills.

The CPB entourage included Cheryl Halpern, chairwoman of the CPB board; Gay Gaines, vice chairwoman of the board; Vinnie Curran, chief operating officer for CPB;

Bill Tyman, chief financial officer; Peggy O'Brien, senior vice president of education; Frank Cruy and Claudia Piug, board member; Wist Smithers, general counsel; Hannah Nassau, assistant to the board; and Teresa Safon, corporate secretary.

KUYI has a partnership with Hopi High School that has created the Hopi High Teen Show. During the school year, students in the radio class interview teachers, administrators, community members and fellow radio students from 1:30-2 on Thursday afternoons.

Halpern said she became involved in radio during her college years and feels that students are lucky when they have that opportunity while they are in high school. She added that radio students learn communication skills that will help them throughout

their life whether or not they decide to go into radio.

Halpern said the Hopi High radio class is fun and inspirational.

Loris Taylor, director of the Center for Native American Public Radio, also called the Hopi High radio class an inspiration for its weekly Hopi High Teen Show and calling in news briefs into KINO in Winslow.

Barbara Poley, executive director of the Hopi Foundation, which owns KUYI, said she listens to KUYI and the Hopi High Teen Show.

Marlene Sekaquaptewa, a board member with the Hopi Foundation, told the radio students that it was good to see they were active in radio.

"We need you. You are our future," Sekaquaptewa said.

Halpern said the visit to the Hopi Reservation is significant because it's the first time that the board visited a reservation.

"KUYI is deeply involved in the community. They bring news, music and vital information to the community," she said.

Curran said KUYI is a place where people can learn.

Curran recounted how he was recently visiting the Lakota Sioux Reservation and he was on a barren road that wasn't close to anything, but he was listening to Native American Calling where people from tribes from throughout the country were talking about different Native American issues. He said this is a key way for native people to communicate with each other.

Noting that this was his second visit to Hopi, Curran told KUYI and the Hopi High radio students that "You make such a difference in your community. You are one of the leading stations in the nation coming up with high quality radio with few resources."

CPB is funded by the federal government to decide the amount of funding for public radio stations such as KUYI, the Hopi community radio station. There are about 800 public radio stations throughout America.

Hopi High Principal Glenn Gilman said he is proud that KUYI and Hopi High have come together for the Hopi High Teen Show. He said he would like to add an advanced radio class in the near future.

Taylor thanked Principal Gilman and others from Hopi High School who have supported the Hopi High Teen Show.

(Editor's note: Emma Thompson, a journalism and radio student at Hopi High, contributed to this article.)

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