Crownpoint Institute of Technology changes name to Navajo Technical College

CROWNPOINT, N.M. - After serving the Navajo Nation for over 25 years, Crownpoint Institute of Technology (CIT) changed its name to Navajo Technical College (NTC) to better reflect its mission and position as a leader in the Navajo Nation and local area higher education.

The new name reflects the college's roots in job training and its expanding mission of offering associates degrees and a wide variety of educational choices for students representing the Navajo Nation and beyond. Navajo Technical College offers associates of applied science degrees and certificates in more than 25 occupations as well as an extensive general education curriculum, Navajo Studies, and adult basic education.

The name also underscores NTC's 20+ year status as an area technical college and identifies the college as located within the Navajo Nation.

As CIT transitions to NTC, the college commits to remaining a leader in higher education for the Navajo Nation, whether for job training or for students transitioning to area universities. Navajo Technical College is becoming one of the best institutions of higher learning in technology, culinary arts, computer-aided design, and a number of other fields. Its students are finding increasing opportunities because of the quality of education they receive.

Some recent positive developments at the college, include:1. Development of the Internet to the Hogan Project designed to provide Internet connectivity to the Eastern Agency of the Navajo Nation; 2. Building and implementation of the Navajo Nation's first supercomputer and a project called Dine Grid, which will provide advanced computer technology services to all of the communities served by Internet to the Hogan; 3. Bidding in process for construction of a new culinary arts facility; 4. Exploration of a new athletic program for students; 5. Addition of the student senate president to the board of trustees; 5. Development of an outreach effort to the Chinle community in Arizona; 6. Ongoing work to upgrade NTC's curriculum for all of its programs; and 7. Updating the college's financial systems, among others.

Under the administration of President Elmer Guy who has served CIT/NTC for over seven years, together with the guidance and leadership of the board of trustees (including board chair Carole Tom, vice-chair Earl Tulley, secretary/treasurer Tincer T. Nez, and board members, Steven Grey, Lynda Lovejoy, and student member Julius Elwood), NTC works to remain among the leaders in higher education in the Navajo Nation, Indian Country and the state of New Mexico.

Part of NTC's name change entailed amendments to the college's articles ofincorporation. The student senate president will now serve on the board of trustees, changing the board membership to a total of 6 with a quorum of 4. Another significant change is NTC's new standing approval to seek funding under P.L. 93-638 as long as the college remains in good standing as a mature contractor. Previously the college had to seek approval from the Navajo Nation Council for BIA funding every three years. These changes were recommended by the NTC board of directors and approved by the Navajo Nation Council on Nov. 1, 2006.

NTC will also be soliciting for a new logo design to match its new name. The winning logo artist will receive $500.

NTC is a tribal college established and chartered by the Navajo Nation. NTC prepares Navajo and other students with a quality technical and vocational education, associates of applied science degrees, or community education in a higher learning setting. The college is in a unique position to transition employees directly into the work force, or to transition students to 4-year schools, thus addressing the needs of the Navajo Nation in an immediate and comprehensive manner.

For further information and comments, call 505-786-4100.

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