Tuba City District’s Excellent Year Awards recognize 43 students

2006 TC High Excellent Year Awardees: back-row left, Dennis Bowen-TC Wellness Coordinator; middle-row, left, Adelbert Goldtooth, Principal TCHS, Harry Yazzie, Cruz Walker, Channing Yazzie, Valentina Nez, Anastasia Polacca, Shavale Scott, Ryan Begaye, Uriah Yellowhorse.

2006 TC High Excellent Year Awardees: back-row left, Dennis Bowen-TC Wellness Coordinator; middle-row, left, Adelbert Goldtooth, Principal TCHS, Harry Yazzie, Cruz Walker, Channing Yazzie, Valentina Nez, Anastasia Polacca, Shavale Scott, Ryan Begaye, Uriah Yellowhorse.

TUBA CITY — Parental involvement is key in any school setting and certainly plays a crucial role in students’ academic success.

So it’s not surprising that Tuba City Unified School District parent committees through Johnson O’Malley, Title VII and No Child Left Behind programs joined Roland Bennett, district Federal Programs director to host an “Excellent Year” banquet on May 23. The idea was to recognize students who had put forth their best efforts while retaining discipline, respect and a positive attitude towards their individual schools. Awardees received signed certificates, books and personal calculators.

Eligible students were selected using academic achievement data.

Both federal and state education programs require schools to develop strategies to get parents to be more involved in their children’s education.

Statistical research data indicates that these students are better behaved, do better in school and have more positive attitudes towards life and education success.

The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has four basic education reform principals, including, stronger accountability for results, local control and flexibility, expanded options for parents, and an emphasis on effective and proven teaching methods.

Suggested areas to increase parent participation include:

• Volunteering to support students and education programs.

• Understanding native child development in order to support children at each age and grade level and to assist in understanding native families.

• Communicating with families about school programs and student progress through an effective school liaison.

• Learning at home —involving families with their children in activities including regular assigned homework and special projects.

• Decision making and sharing options with the students, including school related decisions and plans.

• Collaboration with the community—coordinating local resources and services that can support the student and their educational and emotional needs for positive growth.

Guest speaker for the awards banquet was Nancy Konitzer, deputy association superintendent for No Child Left Behind Programs from the Arizona Department of Education in Phoenix.

TCUSD Superintendent Dr. Hector Tahu and Dennis Bowen, TCUSD Wellness coordinator, also made presentations. Lenora Lewis-IEC Member, provided an invocation.

Students receiving awards included:

• Tsinaabaas Habitiin Elementary School—Justin Couchum, Ty Homer, Roshena Yazzie, Isaiah Begay and Skylar Henry.

• Tonaneesdizi Primary School —Robb Sam Claw, Shayla Naswood, Mikayla Bia, Brandon Smith, Jolinda Bigman, Tressica Johnson, Stonn Billy, Rannyn Kelwood, Justin Mann and Rydell Nockideneh.

• Eagles Nest Intermediate School—Genelda Shepard, Miceala Osborn, Tressa Secody and Julyla Riggs.

• Tonaneesdizi Junior High School— Marlene Dallas, Kurtis Klitso, Brannan Shortman, Crystal Yazzie, Tiffany Nez, Marica Benally, Tanisha Benally and Courtney Charlie.

• Tuba City Alternative High School—Heather Peshlakai, Kevin Chee, Keisha Garcia, Chad Eagle, Tiffany Williams and Prudence Jackson.

• Tonaneesdizi High School— Ryan Begay, Cruz Walker, Trudy Nasetoynewa, Uriah Yellowhorse, Channing Yazzie, Harry Yazzie, Oliver Linton, Valentina Nez, Anatasia Polacca and Shavaie Scout.

Comments

Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comment submissions may not exceed a 200 word limit, and in order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.