AIMS Scores unveiled for Winslow High School

According to the AIMS 2005 Fall summary results for Winslow High School, 30 percent of students fall far below in math, 28 percent approach requirements, 43 percent meet requirements and zero percent exceeds. In reading, three percent fall far below, 49 percent approach, 45 percent meet and two percent exceed. In writing, two percent fall far below, 39 percent approach, 55 percent meet and four percent exceed.

For just juniors this year, 35 percent fall far below in math scores, 26 percent are approaching, 38 percent meet the requirements and zero percent exceed. In reading, five percent fall far below, 54 percent are approaching, 39 percent meet and two percent are exceeding. In writing, four percent falls far below, 47 percent are approaching, 49 percent meet and zero exceeding.

AIMS scores for just seniors in math are 20 percent fall far below, 30 percent approach, 50 percent meet and zero percent exceed. In reading, zero fall far below, 39 percent approach, 58 percent meet and three percent exceed. In writing, zero percent fall far below, 27 percent approach, 64 percent meet and nine percent exceed.

In Navajo County, 32 percent fall far below in math, 26 percent approach, 40 percent meet and 3 percent exceed. In reading, seven percent fall far below, 36 percent approach, 54 percent meet and four percent exceed. In writing, six percent fall far below, 37 percent approach, 51 percent meet and six percent exceed.

In Arizona, approximately 28 percent fall far below in math scores, while 22 percent approach, 44 percent meet and five percent exceed. In reading, eight percent fall far below, 31 percent approach, 53 percent meet and eight percent exceed. In writing, eight percent fall far below, 29 percent approach, 49 percent meet and 13 percent exceed.

The class of 2006 is the first class that has to pass the AIMS test to graduate. This is the fourth time the class of 2006 has taken the AIMS test, and they will have a fifth opportunity in the spring of 2006. An additional 3,700 students passed all three tests as a result of the fall 2005 test.

"We have focused considerable energies on dropout prevention, and the graduation rate has increased from 72.7 percent to 76.8 percent," said Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Horne.

"The three year average is 74.5 percent. In the meantime, the public is interested in what percentage of students, who would have graduated in the absence of a high-stakes test, has passed all three tests. The 74.5 percent three-year average for the graduation rate is based on a freshman cohort of 71,600 students. Using those historical figures, we would expect 53,300 to graduate in the absence of a high-stakes test. As of last spring, 39,700 students passed, and this fall, that increased to 43,400 students. If the same number passes on the 5th try, that would be approximately 90 percent of the students who would have graduated in the absence of a high-stakes test."

"This projection is highly uncertain until we see what happens in the spring," he added. "It does appear probable that at least 90 percent of those who would have graduated in the absence of a high-stakes test will, in fact, graduate. The key will be to do everything possible to encourage those who have not yet passed to take advantage of free tutoring available through the state. 90 percent of those who took tutoring last year either reached proficiency or moved from falls far below to approaches. This proves that the tutoring works, and that the key is to reach those students who have not yet taken advantage of the tutoring that is offered."

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