The boys are back in town

Hotel California, Mogollon and more return to Standin' on the Corner Festival this weekend

Tommy Dukes

Tommy Dukes

Winslow's seventh annual Standing' on the Corner Festival is set for this weekend.

The festival celebrates the town made famous by the Eagles hit "Take it Easy."

Singer/songwriter Jackson Brown began writing "Take it Easy" in the early 1970s. The song appeared, unfinished on Brown's 1973 "For Everyman" album.

Brown played parts of the song for fellow songwriter Glenn Frey, and the rest is history. Frey finished writing the song and added the line about Winslow.

"Well, I'm standin' on the corner in Winslow, Arizona,

"Such a fine sight to see

"It's a girl, my Lord, in a flatbed Ford

"Slowin' down to take a look at me"

For the first time, the Standin' on the Corner Foundation will ask for donations from those attending the festival.

Foundation President Glenn Howeth said the suggested donation is $2 for adults and $5 for a family. The foundation is seeking donations to help defray the cost of the festival, but Howeth said no one would be turned away for not making a donation.

This year's festival looks to be bigger than ever. Howeth said about 40 vendors have already committed to participating and more are calling every day.

A KIDS Zone will be set up with slides, rock climbing, bounce castles and other kit-friendly activities.

Howeth said auction items include a guitar signed by the Eagles. Four other guitars will be auctioned off, one signed by Mogollon, one signed by Hotel California, one signed by Cadillac Angels and one signed by all of the groups performing during the festival.

Howeth said the foundations would also be raffling a child's gas-powered quad. He said a limited number of tickets would be sold.

The City of Winslow partners with the Standin' on the Corner Foundation to help make the festival a reality.

Mayor Jim Boles and the city sponsors two major events each year ‹the Standin' on the Corner Festival and the Christmas Parade. Boles said these are the two events that bring the greatest number of people into the city.

The mayor said in addition to the economic impact on the city, "one thing we hope to do is introduce people to our city and the area. When they come, they generally want to come back. We are not looking just at people coming in and spending their money, although we hope that is true. But, we want them to fall in love with the area and want them to come back."

Boles said city officials have been working with the owners of the Standin' on the Corner mural building, as well as the insurance company to resolve the issues from the fire.

"There comes a time when progress is not satisfactory and you have to take charge. The city is at that point. If there is no action by the insurance company, the city may have to take strong action," Boles said. "If we can't resolve this any other way, the city may have to condemn the property."

In the meantime, the mayor said the city would be screening the property for the festival.

Boles said the Standin' on the Corner Festival has become an annual event for a number of people.

"It has also become a type of homecoming event. A number of Winslow High School graduates return for the festival," Boles said.

The mayor said the festival and the annual car show seem to be a good mix.

"It is still warm enough in the Valley so that people like to get away," Boles said.

The festival will feature an impressive list of entertainers.

Hotel California, an Eagles tribute band, will return Saturday evening and will present its salute to the Eagles by playing nothing but music recorded by the Rock n' Roll Hall of Fame band.

Country band Mogollon will take the stage Saturday evening after Hotel California. The members of Mogollon contacted the Standin' on the Corner Foundation and said they wanted to perform during the 2004 festival.

Howeth said the members of Mogollon and Hotel California know each other. During the 2004 festival the members of Hotel California joined Mogollon on stage for an impromptu jam session that lasted about an hour.

The rest of the lineup for the festival includes Richard Howard, whose music ranges from the 1940s to present day.

This year, the foundation has contracted with world-renowned comic Skip Banks. He will perform his five to six minute act between the musical acts.

Hometown boy Tommy Dukes and his Blues Band will be on hand demonstrating why they are in the Blues Hall of Fame.

The Cadillac Angels play rock-a-billy and rock-n-roll music.

Sounds of Faith, featuring Brenda Graham and Mary Alice Hayes sing religious and gospel music.

It will be a blast to the past when Decades too Late take the stage to perform old-time rock and roll.

Howeth encouraged people to bring their lawn chairs, as the music will continue until between 1 and 2 a.m. each evening.

Howeth said the only thing people can bring into the festival is sealed water bottles. No food or open containers or ice chests are allowed. Fans can bring cameras.

"The foundation would like to thank the city for its help in getting the festival planned," Howeth said.

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