Hopi Marketplace draws master & emerging artists<br>

Authentic pottery, kachinas, baskets, weaving and silverwork were purchased directly from the artists. This gave visitors the unique experience of learning about the artists’ techniques, materials and inspiration on a particular piece of artwork.

This is the oldest Hopi show in the world and the second oldest Native American show after the Santa Fe Indian Market. The show gives a mix of traditional and modern Hopi art.

The Hopi Hoiyum Dancers returned this year along with the new dance groups of Randall Mahle Jr. and Todd Honyaoma and Sons.

Anita Poleahla used songs she composed with Hopi words and puppets to teach children and adults about the Hopi educational philosophy of environmental awareness and appreciation.

The Hopi Preservation Office gave presentations on fake vs. authentic arts and crafts.

Master Artist

Stetson Setalla said he was surprised to win the Master Artist award because this was the first time he entered this show.

Setalla called the Corn Maiden/Sunflower pottery typical of his work, which sells from $1,200 to $1,800. He uses the traditional coil method and uses pigments for paint.

While the designs are traditional, Setalla’s pottery is contemporary because the pot is formed thinner. Thus, it can only be used for show rather than cooking.

He learned the pottery craft from his mother Pauline, potter Mark Tahbo and other artists.

Comments

Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comment submissions may not exceed a 200 word limit, and in order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.