Blackfeather honored in California

POLACCA —"Dead Man Walking," Eli Bojack Blackfeather, has received two prestigious awards for his humanitarian work.

A retired Native American Hollywood stuntman, Blackfeather, known also as Bojack, earned his Hollywood nickname because of his amazing comeback from an aneurysm. Over the past 30 years, he has given out more than 25,000 awards—but was forced to slow down over the past three years due to a stroke. This past January, Blackfeather suffered an aneurysm and was unconscious for 12 days. His outlook at one point was so grim that two priests gave him his last rights.

Now he wants his fans and friends to know that he is okay and on the comeback trail.

Famous for helping various charities, Blackfeather gives awards to Native Americans who excel in all walks of life and those who help Native Americans. The Bojack selections are made by the National Buddy Joe Bojack Committee, which has members throughout the United States. His awards have gone to the president of the U.S., members of Congress and international leaders.

Recently Blackfeather was on the receiving end, when he was given awards by Oakland Vice Mayor Henry Chang and San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown for helping the poor in those communities.

"I’m in the history books now. If I die tomorrow, at least I got these awards," he said. "It just shows that it’s nice to be nice, and those who are nice get paid back."

Blackfeather does not plan to retire from his own efforts. "I’ll keep giving out these awards as long as I can," he said.

Blackfeather, known as Bojack, has helped various charities in this community with helping to feed and clothe the poor. He was also recognized for helping Oakland talent appear in Hollywood films.

"I’m in the history books now. If I die tomorrow, at least I got these awards," he said. "It just shows that it’s great to be a nice person and those who are nice get paid back."

Blackfeather also received an Eagle Emmy from the Southern California Film Making Council, which encourages wholesomeness in film.

Blackfeather recently appeared in the Flagstaff Indian Celebration parade as the grand marshal.

Blackfeather, a former Tuba City resident, gives awards to Native Americans who excel in all walks of life and those who help Native Americans. During the past 30 years, he has given out more than 25,000 awards. His awards have gone to the president of the US, members of Congress and some international leaders.

Blackfeather has been slowed during the past three years due to a stroke and then this past January he suffered an aneurysm where he blacked out for 12 days. His outlook at one point was so grim that two priests gave him his last rites. Now, he wants his fans and friends to know he is okay and on the comeback trail.

The Bojack selections are made by the National Buddy Joe Bojack Committee, which has members throughout the US. Blackfeather has honored hundreds from the Navajo and Hopi reservations.

"I’ll keep giving out these awards as long as I can," Blackfeather said.

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