Ending and beginning<br>Sentencing and reconciliation both part of October 18 in Navajo County Superior Court<br>

October 18-In a marathon day, Judge Fred Newton of the Coconino County Superior Court sentenced seven of the defendants in the Winslow hazing cases to probation, jail terms and community service. The most surprising sentences were the first two, handed down to Logan Payne and Brian Marquez, who had pled guilty to only one count apiece. Payne had since been the only defendant who was not expelled from Winslow High School because a witness came forward to testify that he had not stayed at the scene of the hazing incident. The guilty pleas were all entered on August 25, except Payne who pled a week later.

During the long, difficult day, Judge Newton had to warn the people in the courtroom that certain standards of behavior were to be followed, or arrests might be made for disorderly conduct. This came after a reported incident in the hallway where one person verbally accosted another. In the courtroom everyone sat quietly except for occasional gasps and calls of support to the young men being led directly out of the courtroom by bailiffs or deputy sheriffs. Tears were seen on all sides as eyes were wiped and heads were held, the day wore on and another name was called forward.

During the last round of sentencing, for Steven Garnett, Jr. and Martin Woods, one of the persons to take the stand in their behalf was Steven Garnett, Sr. Garnett, the Interim Police Chief in Winslow, spoke of his pride in his sons and his faith in God. He also said that he loves Winslow and that "we have to find a way to heal the community. I stay here because I love the people of Winslow. Let's get together and work this out."

Following Garnett, Joe Hancock, school Governing Board member and parent of one of the victims, said that he knew and respected the Garnetts and Wilhoites. He had coached the two young men in baseball. Hancock said, "I agree with Mr. Garnett - we have to heal."

In his statements to the various young men who came before him, Judge Newton said that he held them personally responsible for their conduct. Newton said the mitigating factors in each case outweighed the aggravating ones, which is why each sentence was for probation with various jail terms, all less than one year.

The sentences were delivered sequentially, as follows:

Logan Payne pled guilty to one count of aggravated assault. He was sentenced to one year standard probation, 60 days in the county jail and 75 hours of community service.

Brian Marquez pled guilty to one count of aggravated assault. He was sentenced to eighteen months standard probation, 60 days in the county jail and 100 hours community service.

Timothy Lewis pled guilty to three incidents with four counts of aggravated assault. He was sentenced to two years on standard probation, six months in the county jail that can be reviewed in four months, and 150 hours of community service.

William Shoupe pled guilty to three incidents with four counts of aggravated assault. He was sentenced to two years on standard probation, six months in the county jail that can be reviewed in four months, and 200 hours of community service.

Jason Black pled guilty to five counts of aggravated assault. He was sentenced to two years of intensive probation, nine months in the county jail that can be reviewed in six months, and 200 hours of community service.

Steven Garnett, Jr., and Martin Woods (sentenced at the same time). Garnett pled guilty to nine counts and Woods ten counts of aggravated assault. Each was sentenced to three years intensive probation, nine months in the county jail that can be reviewed in six months, and 200 hours of community service. Woods will additionally be drug tested.

All the sentences included an order of no contact with the victims and for each young man to write a letter of apology to both the victims and to the school system. All the young men were told that they could obtain day release for school or for work. Those with the longer sentences were told that they could be eligible to serve as trustees if they met the conditions of the county jail system.

The state has 90 days to file statements about restitution. No fines were levied in the court session.

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