Smithsonian names Native American Veteran’s Memorial winner

Cheyenne and Arapaho Vietnam veteran wins national contest for D.C. memorial

Harvey Pratt's conceptual design for The National Native American Veterans Memorial titled, “Warriors’ Circle of Honor” is an elevated stainless-steel circle resting on an intricately carved stone drum. The memorial will be constructed in Washington D.C.  (Rendering courtesy National Museum of the American Indian)

Harvey Pratt's conceptual design for The National Native American Veterans Memorial titled, “Warriors’ Circle of Honor” is an elevated stainless-steel circle resting on an intricately carved stone drum. The memorial will be constructed in Washington D.C. (Rendering courtesy National Museum of the American Indian)

WASHINGTON — A special jury for the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian has announced their unanimously selected design concept for the National Native American Veterans Memorial, titled, “Warriors’ Circle of Honor.”

The design concept, an elevated stainless steel circle resting on an intricately carved stone drum, was conceived by Harvey Pratt, a Cheyenne and Arapaho Marine Corps Vietnam Veteran. Pratt is a multimedia artist and recently -retired forensic artist.

When initially presenting the concept to the National Museum of the American Indian jury members, Pratt, joined by his project partner Hans Butzer, explained his idea of the circle as the central element to the memorial.

“When we speak of the sacred circle, we look and realize that Native people have honored the sacredness of the circle...there is a circle of life, it is continuous and timeless. That is what our culture is about. It is a matter of simplicity that is yet so strong among people,” Pratt said. “A circle is a powerful object, it brings in power, and sends power out. And that is so important to veterans.”

Pratt also explained various other elements of the memorial to include a fire that would be lit on ceremonial occasions and veterans, families and others would be invited to ‘come to the campfire’ and share their stories.

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The memorial will sit outside the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC. The groundbreaking is slated for September 21, 2019 and the memorial is scheduled to be open to the public by late 2020. (Rendering courtesy National Museum of the American Indian)

The memorial will sit outside the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington D.C. The groundbreaking is slated for Sept. 21, 2019 and the memorial is scheduled to be open to the public by late 2020.

Kevin Gover, Pawnee, director of the National Museum of the American Indian spoke to the importance of Native veterans.

“Through meeting thousands of Native American veterans, I learned most of all about the commitment these veterans have to the well-being of the United States,” he said in a release. “These veterans are perfectly aware that they are serving a country that had not kept its commitments to Native people, and yet they chose — and are still choosing — to serve. This reflects a very deep kind of patriotism. I can think of no finer example of service to the United States and the promise it holds.”

Native Americans serve at a higher rate per capita than any other population group. Few outside the military and American Indian Nations know that Native people have served in the U.S. armed forces since the American Revolution and continue to serve today. The nation’s capital is known for its grand monuments and solemn memorials, including many honoring the nation’s veterans. Yet no national landmark in Washington, D.C., focuses on the contributions of American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians who have served in the military since colonial times.

Congress commissioned the museum to build a National Native American Veterans Memorial that gives “all Americans the opportunity to learn of the proud and courageous tradition of service of Native Americans in the Armed Forces of the United States.”

The museum worked with the National Congress of American Indians and other Native organizations to create an advisory committee composed of tribal leaders, Native veterans and their family members from across the country who assisted with outreach to Native American communities and veterans. The advisory committee and the museum conducted 35 community consultations across the nation to seek input and support for the memorial. These events resulted in a shared vision and set of design principles for the National Native American Veterans Memorial.

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Harvey Pratt, a Cheyenne and Arapaho, served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Vietnam War. Pratt, who is a multimedia artist and recently retired forensic artist submitted a conceptual design - “Warriors’ Circle of Honor” for consideration for the National Native American Veterans Memorial to be constructed in Washington D.C. Pratt’s design was unanimously chosen by a special jury for the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. (Photo courtesy of Indian Country Today)

The National Museum of the American Indian conducted an international competition to select design concepts for the National Native American Veterans Memorial. Don Stastny, an architect and urban designer, oversaw the competition. The design was selected through a juried, two-stage process.

Harvey Pratt is a self-taught artist from Oklahoma that works in oil, watercolor, metal, clay and wood. His works include themes of Native American history and tradition and the Cheyenne people.

Pratt’s public art works include a 7-foot sculptural relief depicting a bald eagle on a Native American shield at the entrance to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation building and a 37-foot-long mural progressing from sepia to color depicting the bureau’s case history.

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