Law students spend spring break in the Navajo Nation

Alternative Spring Break participants from American University Washington College of Law pause for a picture inside the Navajo Nation Council Chambers during their week long internship in Window Rock. (American Univesity Washington College of Law)

Alternative Spring Break participants from American University Washington College of Law pause for a picture inside the Navajo Nation Council Chambers during their week long internship in Window Rock. (American Univesity Washington College of Law)

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — Six American University Washington College of Law students spent a week in Window Rock on an Alternative Spring Break trip organized by the law school’s student organization – Action for Human Rights.

The students completed a weeklong internships at government and non-government organizations, giving them the opportunity to learn about the legal issues facing the Navajo population and research Navajo jurisprudence and legislation.

Karina Wegman, along with Dalya Kefi and Audrey Mulholland were placed at the Navajo Nation Supreme Court, where they wrote bench memoranda for Chief Justice JoAnn Jayne. Chelsea Lalancette was placed at the Navajo Nation Department of Justice, where she wrote legal memoranda to support community economic development projects and ongoing litigation for Attorney General Ethel Branch. Kaori Flores and Bridget Lynn were placed at DNA Legal Services, where they served clients seeking civil legal services.

This is the ninth year that AUWCL has sent students to the Navajo Nation for Alternative Spring Break. Past participants include Adjua Adjei-Danso and Lillian Schwales in 2016, who now both work as Economic and Community Development Attorneys at Navajo Nation Department of Justice, and Mariah McKay, also in 2016, whose first job on the reservation was with DNA-Peoples Legal Services and who now is an Assistant District Attorney in Farmington, New Mexico.

Information provided by American University College of Law

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