Tuba City Primary School students take home top prizes at 2015 Navajo Nation Science Fair

Tuba City School District’s Primary School students brought home a number of awards at this year’s Navajo Nation Science Fair. Back row from left: Audrey Tallsalt, Miara Bilagody, Aaliyah Daw, Anna Begay, Riley Ignacio, Zachary Song and Oliver Cortes. Front row from left:  third grade teacher Pedro Conzaga, Candice Tsosie, Lynn Goldtooth, Presley Parrish, Hyler Peterson, Adriano Phillips, Chelsey Yazzie, Katherine Nez, Maria Macaraig, Wyatt Yazzie, Science Fair Coordinator Phillip McCabe and Science Committee member Vilma Morala. Photo/Rosanda Suetopka

Tuba City School District’s Primary School students brought home a number of awards at this year’s Navajo Nation Science Fair. Back row from left: Audrey Tallsalt, Miara Bilagody, Aaliyah Daw, Anna Begay, Riley Ignacio, Zachary Song and Oliver Cortes. Front row from left: third grade teacher Pedro Conzaga, Candice Tsosie, Lynn Goldtooth, Presley Parrish, Hyler Peterson, Adriano Phillips, Chelsey Yazzie, Katherine Nez, Maria Macaraig, Wyatt Yazzie, Science Fair Coordinator Phillip McCabe and Science Committee member Vilma Morala. Photo/Rosanda Suetopka

TUBA CITY, Ariz. - This year's Navajo Nation Science Fair almost didn't happen. The event was originally slated for mid-February but because of extreme winter weather and difficult road conditions on the way to Gallup, New Mexico's Red Rock State Park the event was moved to a different date. Then another scheduling conflict with reservation-wide spelling bee events prevented some student science entrants to drop out of some event.

But eventually the science event took place March 5 at Red Rock State and it was Tuba City Primary School students who came home with several top prizes. The district governing board and Primary School Principal Sharlene Navajo recognized the students for their scientific efforts and winning projects.

Primary School Science Fair Committee Chairman Phillip McCabe and steering committee members were pleased with this year's entries. The prizes for winners gave many of the young student scientists encouragement and a willingness to go on to more sophisticated projects and year-round science pursuits.

McCabe was pleased to announce the following student winners for Tuba City Primary School:

First Place: Candace Tsosie, third grade. Individual project "Horses" - Behavorial and Social Science category.

First Place: Lynn Goldtooth and Adriano Phillips, third grade. Team project "Ordinary, Chemical, Organic" -Biology science category.

First Place: Parrish Presley and Wyatt Yazzie, third grade. Team project "Holding Water" -Environmental Science.

Third Place: Hyler Peterson, third grade. Individual project "Hummer: My Sacred Bird" - Animal Science category.

Third Place: Miara Bilagody, second grade. Individual project "Effects of Soda on Blood Glucose"- Behavorial and Social Science category.

Fourth Place: Chelsey Yazzie, third grade. "Flying All Levels" -Engineering and Computer Science category.

Fourth Place: Aaliyah Daw and Santiena Kuwanhyoima, third grade. Team project "Sweets: Friend or Foe?" - Chemistry category.

Fifth Place: Zachary Song, third grade. Individual project "Walking on Eggs" -Engineering and Computer Science category.

According to TC Primary Science Fair coordinator McCabe, all students were judged not only on their individual or team projects but also on their active participation in the final science event.

Student science entrants visited the Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock the day before the contest, enhancing their field trip visit with educational museum exhibits and a chance to see an award winning Navajo Codetalkers photo exhibit by photographer Kenji Kewano.

The Tuba City Primary School student scientists competed with primary aged students from all over Arizona, New Mexico and Utah, making this a highly competitive event.

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