As Sam Sees It

Sports haven’t been the same since Sept. 11, a date that truly will live in infamy. Not much in this world will be the same after that act of terror and cowardice. America will rise up in righteous indignation and smite those who commit such acts and those who support them. We will be stronger than before and much more resolute. The day will come, though, when we get back to the diversion of sports. In fact, we will be there even before the job of retribution is completed.

The Winslow Bulldogs face a formidable task on Friday when they entertain the defending Arizona State 3A Football Champion Blue Ridge Yellowjackets at Emil Nasser Stadium. The Blue Ridge football program is the envy of all Arizona schools regardless of size and among the most successful in the United States.

Victories over Blue Ridge are few and far between. Winslow had none in the decade of the 90s, though the Bulldogs did manage to keep the score respectable and several occasions, most notably in their last appearance in a state championship game. Keeping the score respectable is, itself, a feat most teams have found unattainable.

Winslow is no longer a member of the same region as the Yellowjackets and does not have to play them. Give the ‘Dogs credit. They have elected to play the team virtually everyone agrees is the best the state has to offer.

A victory would be nice and will be the goal. Win or lose, though, this game could show just how close the Bulldogs are to being the best.

Good luck, Bulldogs!!

Several writers, including this one, have written that the woes of the Arizona Diamondbacks began with the three losses in San Diego during their most recent road trip. Second though, however, has me wondering if it didn’t really start with the Mike DiFelice incident in Pittsburgh. The team lost that series to a team that came in with a massive losing streak, then split four games with the Phillies in Philadelphia. They were able to right the ship long enough to take two of three from the Giants at home, but then dropped those three games in San Diego and two of three to the Giants in San Francisco.

The D-Backs were coming off their best home stand of the season in which they swept all six games and going against the Pirates, a team they had swept during that home stand when the distraction occurred. The Pirates not only won two of three; they beat both of Arizona’s Cy Young candidates. It is hard to believe that the poor baseball and the incident were just coincidences. Whatever the cause, it is time to get over it and get about the business of winning the pennant.

It was a bit of a disappointment to see Anneas Williams rip the Arizona Cardinals organization after his trade to the St. Louis Rams. It seems quite possible from here that the interviewer may have pushed for the type of response he got.

If Williams wrote the letter he talked about to the owners after Arizona had made the play-offs and defeated Dallas in the first round, why didn’t he give it to them? He supposedly detailed how they should go about the next step on their way to a Super Bowl appearance. If he didn’t send it, why did he keep it? More importantly, why disclose it now?

Maybe the most important question regarding the Cardinals and the Bidwills is for some of my colleagues in the media. “Why is it that almost everything said about this franchise negative?”

The organization has made some colossal mistakes in the past. Most are ancient history now.

Baltimore Raven owner Art Model took his team (the former Cleveland Browns) from a Cleveland, a city that had supported them better than a vast majority of NFL cities are supported. What he did to Cleveland was worse and less deserved than anything the Bidwills have done to Arizona or to St. Louis for that matter. It is time to forgive and give the Cardinals and the Bidwills a second chance.

Comments

Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comment submissions may not exceed a 200 word limit, and in order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.